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Happy Days

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« on: February 02, 2012, 11:02:57 AM »
Er,….I have a question lads……

What is the difference between an Epoxy glue, and an Epoxy Resin? :?:

I have to do a little fibreglass repair, so should I use a resin, or a glue,…Hu? :(

Yours unsure,
Keith
Try not to run out of airspeed, altitude and ideas....... all at the same time.

Alan_Perse

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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2012, 19:03:29 PM »
Well Keith, I'm no expert but I think epoxy glue is thicker than epoxy resin. The epoxy resin is usually used for laminating because its thinner.But apart from that they are prity much the same I think.

rogallo

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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2012, 19:12:21 PM »
Lads,
  glue refers to an adhesive produced from the bones of animals, usually horses from a knackers yard. When used in relation to modern day adhesives it shows the manufacturer knows nothing about the product.
So keith, the same thing really just misuse of the queens english again!

Hope this helps..........

R

mow i finished readint the question I see the answer needs another question, is it epoxy glass or polyester? prob epoxy so cyano to put back together and glass and epoxy to bandage afetr
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2012, 20:25:28 PM »
Kieth,

Ralph is right there... just bad use of the english language.

It's the setting time would be more important too. If its a tricky repair in a spot under high loads then use a slow set epoxy for a stonger bond and will let you work slowly under less pressure.
It's the accelerator(hardnener) that sets the speed of set btw. You can use the epoxy resin from any type (5min 12min 30min set time) but its only the hardners speed that counts.

I am currently using a bottle of Tower Hobbies Hardener 5min with Araldite presision Resin works just fine and sets in 5 min.

D.
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Happy Days

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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2012, 21:22:58 PM »
Thanks for your info guys. :D

I’d pretty much come to the same conclusion vis Resin & Glues = same thing. Although I think Alan has a point about viscosity being a possible factor in the “glues” description. ---------I don’t know. :!:  

As for the repairs, I’ve bandaged the damaged areas. :D

So,…..next question: How do you know the difference between glass & polyester? :?:

Come on now, don’t be shy,……tell the Keithy  :lol:

K.
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johnfireball

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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2012, 01:00:27 AM »
Hi Keith,
      I assume you mean the difference between epoxy and polyester resins. Epoxy when set looks less shiny than dry polyester resin and If you sand dried polyester it will smell like polyester wheras epoxy has a neutral smell and sands different but the smell of polyester never goes away.
John.
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joe

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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2012, 08:26:39 AM »
Basically:
Epoxy when used with the same fibreglass as polyester. Is stronger, less prone to cracking and does not shrink over time.

Epoxy generally takes longer to cure, has a set mix ratio and can cure in a vacuum. Poly cure time is dependant on amount of catalyst used and usually comes mixed with styrene which evaporates during curing.

Polyester is smelly and the fumes are bad. Also the catalyst is nasty if not treated with care.

Epoxy is not so smelly and fumes are not a big issue. Repeated exposure to skin can cause an allergic reaction.

Epoxy is expensive, Polyester is half the price.

Poly is fine epoxy is usually better. Depends of the application.

There is also vinyl ester which is a mixture of both. :D

Happy Days

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« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2012, 08:37:54 AM »
DAM, I’ve just banged my head on the floor!!!!
I fell backwards off my chair when I saw your avatar Joe!!!

Are you back in the land of the living??
Are we going to see you on the slopes again??
Are we about to enjoy reading your postings on this forum once more??

Welcome home Sunshine!

Oh, and thanks for your info as well :D

K.
Try not to run out of airspeed, altitude and ideas....... all at the same time.

joe

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« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2012, 08:45:04 AM »
Oops! Sorry Keith.
To answer your questions
I never left
Probably
Hard to say.

It's good to be back :)

Fred

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« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2012, 09:16:25 AM »
Ok, so, let's talk about the vinylsthere now  :mrgreen:

Sorry, missed this topic until now, but what Joe said.
And same for epoxy "glue" and resin, is the consistency and work time, other than that, that's the same.
Education is important, but flying RC planes and gliders is importanter!

Happy Days

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« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2012, 11:16:37 AM »
Thanks gentlemen :D

Quote from: "joe"


Epoxy generally takes longer to cure, has a set mix ratio and can cure in a vacuum. Poly cure time is dependant on amount of catalyst used and usually comes mixed with styrene which evaporates during curing.



That’s the most interesting bit. :?:

Evidently,  in Epoxy glue/resin the hardener forms an integral part of the adhesive compound.
In polyester resin the hardening is triggered by the addition of a catalyst which presumably remains within the cured compound or becomes part of the volatiles’ and evaporates off.

Thanks for that Joe. I do trust you’ll be staying around :)  to inject any further little gems of knowledge you may have into this otherwise rather drab & uneventful forum! :roll:  (I’m only joking lads. :D  Don’t start PM’ing me a load of hate mail. :lol: )

K.
Try not to run out of airspeed, altitude and ideas....... all at the same time.

joe

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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2012, 16:13:05 PM »
As always I shall endeavor to make your life a little less drab Keith  \:D/